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Contents of a Middle School’s Vending Machines

Posted by tinako on February 28, 2011

I surveyed the contents of my son’s middle school vending machines and analyzed the results. My purpose was to share this with parents in our district, but it is closely related to my other nutrition posts, so here they are, for my local friends or anyone who wonders what our children face every day:

Beverage Machines

Snack Machines

 

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3 Responses to “Contents of a Middle School’s Vending Machines”

  1. Rob said

    Vending machines are simply tiny convenience stores. I rarely expect to find anything nutritious or vegan in them. They are a sad sight, like finding a Wal-Mart in an otherwise nice neighborhood.

    Must children’s bodies be degraded so early in life? Surely there is another way for the school to raise funds.

  2. Wow. I’m quite shocked. I work in a Middle school (ages 9 – 13), and we have no vending machines in our school. The children aren’t allowed to bring in fizzy drinks or sweets either. There are often unhealthy things in the packed lunches provided by their parents, but none are available on school premises. Although, there is a convenience store nearby and I know many children do visit on their way into school but at least that isn’t actually supplied by the school.

    I suspect there are more unhealthy choices available at my daughters High School, I’ll have to ask her.

    • tinako said

      With your middle school as you describe, it is likely that this is a district-wide policy (or a law). Hopefully your HS will be the same.
      It is my experience that parents, unless they go into the schools and look for the food, have no idea how bad it is. Places to look are the lunchline (in our district parents are always welcome to come in for lunch and even purchase), vending machines, fundraisers, concession stands, and finding out about parties (birthday, holiday, and behavior rewards).
      Progress is VERY slow, especially with our unsupportive PTSA whose leadership is in favor of junk in schools, but my friend and I have discovered that our school wellness policy is not in compliance with the law, so we are pulling together a presentation for the district supervisor on what the (legal) problem is and how it can be fixed and at the same time have our nutritional policies reflect the excellence of our school. Because talking to the wellness committees (or even being on one – my friend and I were) is pointless – they have no authority. We’ve become experts in what doesn’t work!

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